The QuasiChristian

Critical Thinking and Spiritual Reasoning

Eddie Long Can Repent By Apologizing For Gay Bashing


Earl Ofari Hutchinson

Embattled mega church preacher Bishop Eddie Long came as close to confessing his sexual debauchery as any debaucher could come without actually confessing. He cryptically told his singing, shouting, handclapping flock that he wasn’t a perfect man, and that he would face some painful situations. This was a good step forward for Long. He didn’t do the usual soft shoe, duck and dodge around the issue. Or worse, defiantly claim that he was being persecuted for being a pure and righteous man of God. Or even worse still, break out in a teary eyed plea to family and flock for forgiveness.


Long set the standard of bigotry and bias for a new generation of conservative fundamentalist mega black churchmen on gay rights. An apology and outreach won’t undo that. It can though be a step toward his personal repentance. God, I’m sure, would approve.

Link to Article (Continue Reading)

September 26, 2010 Posted by | Current Events | , , , , | Leave a comment

Bishop Eddie Long Case: Will It Alter Black Church’s View Of Gays?


Patrik Jonsson

In 2004, Eddie Long, one of the richest and most powerful pastors in the black megachurch movement, led a march in Atlanta against homosexuality. This week, Mr. Long faces civil charges, which he has denied, that he took sexual advantage of two teenage boys from his flock.

How black evangelicals will respond to the allegations against Long is difficult to tell. Some in the African-American community worry that the allegations will deepen mistrust of homosexuals, especially because of the age of the alleged victims (although no criminal charges have been filed).

“The point is not whether [Long] is gay or not or he denies or admits it, but this is really about how people [in the black community] feel that black people should be represented in public, and that is about being heterosexual,” says Melinda Chateauvert, an African-American studies professor at the University of Maryland, in College Park. “There are [millions] of black people who are gay, members of families, pastors of churches, who serve in the military – they’re everywhere. But the deliberate closeting – not necessarily by them, but by other people – is really problematic.”

Link to Article (Continue Reading)


September 23, 2010 Posted by | Current Events | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Changing Face Of Homelessness


An older article but still timely. Don’t be so quick to write off someone who’s homeless as being a deadbeat or drug addict. When you see a homeless person why not take the time to find out why they’re in that situation. Perhaps there is something you can do to be of assistance, other than pray that God intervene on their behalf.

People who work with the homeless say they’re seeing more families, more women and children, and more people who were knocked down by a job loss, divorce or domestic violence – or by jobs that paid too little and medical bills or housing that cost too much. They are also seeing more people who have jobs that pay minimum wage or less and can’t afford housing.

Shelters are teeming with veterans and teenagers, people struggling with mental illness and substance abuse, people who have been homeless for years, and new arrivals who never imagined they would be homeless.

Link to Article

September 22, 2010 Posted by | Societal Concerns | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Does The Black Church Have A Future? A Debate Continues


The vibrancy and viability of America’s black churches have suddenly become matters of intense debate among African-American religious leaders. The debate was sparked by a Huffington Post “obituary” for the black church, which prompted numerous responses about the fate of one of America’s most important and enduring religious institutions.

The genesis of the controversy was the Feb. 24, 2010, essay, “The Black Church Is Dead,” by Eddie S. Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and chair of the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University.

Glaude noted that while nearly 90 percent of African-Americans identify with a religious group and blacks are one of the most religious communities in American society, “the idea of this venerable institution [the black church] as central to black life and as a repository for the social and moral conscience of the nation has all but disappeared.”

Link to Article

September 22, 2010 Posted by | Societal Concerns | , | Leave a comment